All Books Sale Books Course Books Events & News Stores Sale Books Sale Books Course Books Course Books Course Books Events & News Events & News Events & News Stores
twitter
All Books
on our tables
new releases
best sellers
Browse the Labyrinth...
African American Studies
African Studies
Anthropology & Archaeology
Architecture
Art
Asian Studies
Biography
Children's Books
Christianity
Classical Studies
Cognitive Sciences
Cultural Studies
Current Events
Design & Fashion
Eastern European Studies
Eastern Religion & Philosophy
Economics
Education
Environmental Studies
European History & Politics
Film & Media
Food & Cooking
Foreign Language
Gay & Lesbian Studies
General History & Historiography
Home, Garden & Crafts
Islamic Studies
Jewish Studies
Labor Studies
Latin Am. & Caribbean Studies
Law & Legal Studies
Linguistics & Languages
Literary Theory & Criticism
Literature
Marxist Studies
Medical & Health Studies
Middle Eastern Studies
Music & Dance
Mythology
Native American Studies
Natural History & Nature
No export
Philosophy
Photography
Political Philosophy
Political Science
Psychoanalysis
Psychology
Reference
Religion
S. Asian Studies & Oceania
Sciences
Sociology
Stationery
Technology, Computers & Engineering
Trade Fiction
Trade Non-fiction
Travel
U.S. History & Politics
Urban Studies & Geography
Women's Studies
Title Details
Paraliterary by Emre, Merve
Paraliterary: The Making of Bad Readers in Postwar America
by Emre, Merve
 
Literature departments are staffed by, and tend to be focused on turning out, “good” readers—attentive to nuance, aware of history, interested in literary texts as self-contained works. But the vast majority of readers are, to use Merve Emre’s tongue-in-cheek term, “bad” readers. They read fiction and poetry to be moved, distracted, instructed, improved, engaged as citizens. How should we think about those readers, and what should we make of the structures, well outside the academy, that generate them?
We should, Emre argues, think of such readers not as non-literary but as paraliterary—thriving outside the institutions we take as central to the literary world. She traces this phenomenon to the postwar period, when literature played a key role in the rise of American power. At the same time as American universities were producing good readers by the hundreds, many more thousands of bad readers were learning elsewhere to be disciplined public communicators, whether in diplomatic and ambassadorial missions, private and public cultural exchange programs, multinational corporations, or global activist groups. As we grapple with literature’s diminished role in the public sphere, Paraliterary suggests a new way to think about literature, its audience, and its potential, one that looks at the civic institutions that have long engaged readers ignored by the academy.
 
 
Published November, 2017 by University of Chicago Press, Paperback, 304 Pages, ISBN: 9780226473970, ISBN-10: 022647397X, List Price $27.50.

Buy New - $27.50
 Add to Wish List

Other books in Cultural Studies
Other books in United States History & Politics - 20th Century
Other books in Literary Theory & Criticism
 
 
Inventory Snapshot
Princeton --> New for $27.50
All Books Sale Books Course Books Events & News Stores All Books Sale Books Course Books All Books All Books Course Books Course Books help policies contact
All Books on our tables new releases
best sellers